Tag Archive: The Stranglers

The Stranglers + Nine Below Zero @ 02 Academy, Birmingham – 22 March 2014

My calendar was set for date 12 months ago even before the dates were announced. Like clockwork this is a annual night out that’s almost set in stone. And this time it’s a tad special. With a glint of ruby, this band are celebrating 40 years in the business. There can be few as resilient and as enduring, with a back catalogue to die for, than what these icons of the alternative possess. With a true stubbornness to call it quits, we’re here to see one of the UK’s most enduring bands – The Stranglers.

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The fans tonight are keen and up for a party, quite rightly, as we wait for the support to come on. Nine Below Zero are an English blues band formed in ‘77. Dennis Greaves, Brendan O’Neil, Mark Feltham (also a member of Rory Gallagher’s band) and Brian Bethel (part of the Blow Monkeys) were a popular alternative to the mainstream in the early 80s. And since, they’ve achieved cult like status across Europe since. “Oy stop your nagging will ya!” as they go into a rimp-romping blues riff by the same name. With cover a cover from the legend that is Wilko Johnson, NBZ give us total rhythm and blues with harmonica in tow. ‘Three times is enough’ takes us back to ska / early Madness – NBZ are great fun and hugely slick. “We’ve only been in the business 35 years! Mark’s mom asked him if we were on the tour with the Strangles! If they’re the Strangles, we’re Nine Below Under…” A cover of Canned Heat’s ‘On the Road Again’ get’s us boogying, before “Let’s have a go at one we did as kids…” as they go into ’11 + 11.’ They tell us they’ll be back in Brum later in the year – check them out – they’re well worth a punt as they finish their set with a harmonica-blues, hornpipe-like, rip-roaring edition of ‘Riding on the N+L.’

Academy is packed tonight; the lads still pull in a large crowd and we’re here to party. While we wait in good spirits, the partisan Brum crowd sing along to ELO’s ‘Mr Blue Sky’…

Formed in ’74 by founding members Jean Jaques (J.J.) Burnel, Jet Black and Hugh Cornwell, Dave Greenfield joined them within a year. A series of successful punk hits, then embracing a more commercial yet unique sound during the eighties, The Stranglers became a regular not only in the charts, but on the touring scene. Cornwell left in ‘90, they uncompromisingly replaced him with Paul Roberts. Then 14 years ago, Roberts left and still not in a mind for calling it a day, The Stranglers duly replaced him with vocalist and guitarist Baz Warne, who fits in so well, that you‘d think he’d been here for the full forty years. The incredible Jet Black, is still here, still drumming away at 75, but now sharing the role with touring drummer and ‘youngster’ Jim Macauly. On stage there be two drum kits, side by side.

The lights go down and we get THE classic Stranglers intro ‘Waltzinblack’ which morphs into chains clunking and doors slamming shut. To a huge cheer from the crowd, the original Men in Black set off as they mean to go on with ‘London Lady’; J.J. taking vocal duties, before THAT bass riff and we’re into ‘No More Heroes.’ Already we’re all singing our hearts out; song completes to a huge cheer. As the reddened set fades to blue it’s ‘Coup de Grace…’ which fades into the in your face ‘Was It You?’ – J.J. back on vocals.

Warne: “Good evening Birmingham how the f*** are you? Thank you for coming to our fortieth – we’ll just keep on going shall we?” Yet another big cheer – a hallmark of the evening. ‘Threatened’ is just part of a set that covers every genre they’ve ever dabbled in – from the sublime to in your face punk – as J.J. gives it his all on ‘Somat Outanowt.’ I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, J.J. is one of the best bass players you’ll ever see – the rhythm section of the band in such synch, it seems effortless. ‘Still Life’ maybe the more beautiful side,  before another another classic J.J.bass riff and they’re walking on the beaches, looking at the ‘Peaches’ to yet another huge cheer.

Warne has acoustic guitar now as they deliver ‘Midnight Summer Dream’. The crowd chant in unison “Jet Black, Jet Black, Jet Black….” and he is indeed here to take his place, before they deliver The Stranglers at their most beautiful ‘Golden Brown.’ We love it – cheers for Warne as he takes to the front on the stage and we sing. We cheer. Again. Pure class.

The broad grins from the band tell you exactly why, after 40 years, they’re still doing this.

It may be a bitterly cold near spring night outside but in here it’s ‘Always the Sun’ and we sing the chorus loudly. The chanting goes up again…. “Jet Black, Jet Black, Jet Black….”as the band roll into ‘Genetix.’ Warne introduces Black as he takes his leave  and Brum boy and touring drummer Macauly takes his place. Warne: “And for people of a certain age – that be all us really – it’s physical time…” And as the beat goes on Warne and J.J. stomp across the stage, linking arms to pirouette before they’re into ‘Thrown Away.’ The band are so tight, Warne so fully synched into the band live that you would never think they’d been others in his place.

The punky ‘Nuclear Device’ leads to another classic – ‘Skin Deep’ – which we bop along and sing along before the customary huge cheer. Birds squawk – we’re now in…. bang! to ‘Valley of the Birds.’  And from drums, to beat, guitar, then bass – giddy-up it’s ‘Nice n’ Sleazy.’

Warne: “Dya mind if we have a break – we’ve just done 10 songs without a break…” We know how you feel, we’re standing, dancing, some seated and we feel kinda guilty;  if the band can deliver like this after forty years we’re not going to complain about any aches and pains we may have. “… and we’re getting old! What’s that?” Warne asks a audience member – to a confused response “You’ve had one too many sandwiches my friend…”

Then into ‘Walk On By’ the band jam away, effortlessly in perfect musical harmony, making it look so easy. On and on and on and on.… A moment to chill, as the waves wash over us and then crank up into ‘Freedom is Insane.’ Catch your breath, here we go for the crescendo; ‘Duchess’ which we complete with “God forbid!”, then ‘Five Minutes’ and the the main set completed with ‘Hanging Around.’

Wow. After a frenetic 1 hour 45 we all, let alone the band, finally get a break. The encore doesn’t let up the pace at all. Warne: “You lucky devils – you enjoying yourselves?” As we power into ‘Norfolk Coast’, followed by ‘Something Better Change’, we chant back, before a drum solo and J.J. shouts the line to bring it to a full stop. Final song gets us singing again- ‘All Day and All of the Night’. We’re loving it. As the band depart: but it’s not over, they’re not done yet. Quick break and it’s ‘Tank’ complete with a shirtless (and still very fit) J.J. plus a stage invader.

Warne completes the night with a huge grin and “Thank you very much. Goodnight.”

Wow. Probably the best I’ve seen them and that’s saying something, The Stranglers are always standout. Over a two hour set – The Stranglers remain one hell of a class act, slick and professional yet still remain uncompromising, at times beautiful whilst at other moments in your face.  And they still clearly love what they do. After all these years. They played 31 songs and I can still count a long list of the tracks they didn’t play.  This is part of a 22 date UK tour – Bristol and Manchester are, quite rightly,  sold out. Then 15 dates in Europe and they’re back over the summer for festivals – including V in August. Go check them out – you won’t be disappointed Their annual Birmingham date is in my diary already for next year for when the Men in Black return…

Tonight, at times, my thoughts went to a friend; a long term Stranglers fan.  He was diagnosed with the big C and over the past few years, no matter how difficult, he’d made the annual trip to see them – and loved every single minute. But he didn’t make this 40 th gig. A life cut short way too early. I believe he was here in spirit, with a grin as broad as each band member as The Stranglers delivered their classics in all their glory tonight.

So to finish this review with words from J.J. Burnel himself:

“On this, the occasion of our Ruby Anniversary, I would like to take this opportunity to stick my fingers up to everyone who wrote us off and dismissed us. However I would like to thank those who saw beyond the words of the critics and drew their own conclusions. He who laughs last, laughs longest AND loudest. This year we will make a lot of noise with our friends…”

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Setlist:
Intro – Waltzinblack
London Lady
No More Heroes
Coup de Grace
Was It You?
Threatened
Somat Outanowt
Peasant in the Big Shitty
Still Life
Peaches
Midnight Summer Dream
Golden Brown
Always the Sun
Genetix
Thrown Away
Never Look Back
Nuclear Device
Skin Deep
Time to Die
Lowlands
Valley of the Birds
Nice n Sleazy
Walk On By
Freedom is Insane
Duchess
Five Minutes
Hanging Around

Encore I:
Norfolk Coast
Something Better Change
All Day and All of the Night

Encore II:
Tank

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Review for Gig Junkies; Pictures by Ken Harrison.

The Stranglers + The Godfathers @02 Academy, 16 March 2013

So it’s THAT time of year again – I set my calendar to remind me of this date a year ago; way before tour dates were announced. Spot on schedule one of the UK’s most enduring bands, The Stranglers are back in town. These guys unique style has lead to 23 UK top 40 singles and 17 UK top 40 albums and with a true stubbornness to call it quits, even with the loss of more than one lead singer; they’ve successfully achieved a career spanning four decades

As I turn up to the 02 Academy there’s massive queues. The problem appears to be something to do with a failure in the ticketing system, which has led to quite a delay. By the time most people are still getting into the venue after 8, the support act is already on stage.

The Godfathers formed way back in ’85 by Peter and Chris Coyne after the demise of previous band The Sid Presley Experience. Whilst they made their name on the indie / punk scene, they didn’t really get a break in the UK and spilt. Various reformations over the years, in the late noughties they reformed with the original line-up. This didn’t last long, but now they’ve found stable group and path and have been recording – new album due soon I believe, plus lots of dates including this month long tour with The Stranglers. They remain loud, aggressive, rock, rhythm and blues punk – Chris Coyne has deep raspy vocals and a no nonsense attitude to hecklers. They go down well.

Busy noisy crowd as we wait for The Stranglers. Crowd is chatting excitedly, plus a couple of blokes who should know far better and have drunk too much falling down water. One is practically passed out on a sofa. The other hurls a huge volume over the carpet, before the bouncers clock him. Lovely.

The crowd is expectant and whistles start. Formed in ’74 by founding members Jean Jaques (J.J.) Burnel, Jet Black and Hugh Cornwell, Dave Greenfield joined them within a year. A series of successful punk hits, then a more commercial yet unique sound during the eighties, The Stranglers became a regular not only in the charts, but also on the touring scene. Cornwell may have left in 1990, but not to be outdone, The Stranglers became one of the few bands, especially at that time, to replace their lead singer and carry on, employing Paul Roberts on vocals. Then Roberts left 13 years ago, but that was no stopping the boys, bring on guitarist Baz Warne. The incredible Jet Black, is still drumming away at 74, and now shares the role with Brum-born ‘youngster’ Jim Macauly. Macauly plays the first half the set, then Black, then a shared duty double drummers. Black will be appearing on this tour as long as there’s space for two kits.

Stage is darkened.  And on they come to the cheeky ‘Waltzinblack’ as the strip light backdrop to their set scrolls The Stranglers. The crowd cheer – their heroes are back in town. The set starts off – with bass beat and meandering synths its ‘Toiler in the Sea’ which goes down really well with the crowd, clearly chuffed to get their annual fix. The beat starts and we’re into ‘Grip’ – get singing –  “But the money’s no good – just get a grip on your self.…”  The Stranglers are indeed, on a mission tonight.

Warne: “Good evening night – wet, horrible fuckin’ night, thank you for coming… will you welcome on drums, from Birmingham, Jim Macauly.…” Macauly’s is giving it some; The Stranglers at their best are frenetic and are as they go into ‘Norfolk Coast.’

Now it’s ‘J.J.’ time – a plethora of songs where he takes the vocal lead. “J.B. [Jet Black] will be here in a moment…” Warne responds to an eager punter. And then it’s the classic bass riff that is ‘Peaches.’

And next up the mild mannered floating mid 80s hit about a subject we sorely need – ‘Always The Sun’ – the crowd chant back the chorus. Several songs are from this era tonight – including ‘European Female’ which seamlessly merges from ‘Midnight Summer Dream.’ And then at 10.20 the crowd cheer even louder as Jet Black takes the drums – “Jet Black… Jet Black… Jet Black…” chant the crowd, as he drums the intro and takes us into ‘Genetix.’

‘Golden Brown’ remains the beautiful warbling masterpiece with THAT melody that you just melt into, even now. Then we get ‘Skin Deep’ before ‘Nice n Sleazy’ with the dah dah dah and the wicked bass.

For the encore Burnel presents Warne with framed discs – it’s his 500th gig with the band tonight. ”Only been with The Stranglers 13 years… first time I’m speechless… really touched…”

“This is the Feel It Live Tour – can you feel it?” as Burnel strums his bass deeper and deeper ‘til it goes through the entire audience – quiet literally. “I fuckin’ can!” says Warne. “Thank you, you lovely people you enjoyed yourselves?” Before we get ‘Something Better Change’ followed by the classic ‘No More Heroes’. Quick break and final track ‘Tank’ with a cheery “Bye-bye” from Warne. Cracking 1 hour 50 set – full of energy – and my ears still buzz from Burnel’s bass – guess I’m still ‘Feeling It.’

The Stranglers are indeed one hell of a class act, J.J. probably one of the best bass players out there. And they are still uncompromising. And still clearly love what they do after all these years. And they roll on. After this UK tour, and a few dates in Europe, they’re off to North America for the first time in 15 years (so I’m guessing therefore this’ll be a first for Warne). Then back for festivals in York and down south.  Then winter will return and we can wait a little while. For the annual return of The Stranglers. Date is already in my diary lads….

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Setlist….

1. Intro – Waltzininblack

2. Toiler in the Sea

3. Goodbye Toulouse

4. (Get a) Grip (on Yourself)

5. Norfolk Coast

6. Time was Once on my Side

7. Thrown Away

8. Freedom is Insane

9. Mercury Rising

10. Peaches

11. Always the Sun

12. Relentless

13. Bring on the Nubiles

14. Duchess

15. Midnight Summer Dream

16. European Female

17. Genetix

18.Bitching

19. Golden Brown

20. Skin Deep

21. Nice n Sleazy

22. Who Wants the World

23. Straighten Out

Encore 1:

24. Something Better Change

25. No More Heroes

Encore 2:

26. Tank

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Listening:

Too many great albums to mention but because it reminds me of a moment in time and it includes ‘Always The Sun’…..

Dreamtime [1986]

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Review for Gig Junkies. Pictures: Ken Harrison.

The Stranglers + The Popes + Mike Marlin @02 Academy – 10 March 2012

Review for Birmingham Live! Pictures: Ken Harrison.

If you place a reminder in your diary every year, then put these guys on the list, you can pretty much be guaranteed they’ll be around for you to see live. One of the UK’s most enduring bands, The Stranglers unique style has lead to 23 UK top 40 singles and 17 UK top 40 albums. A true stubbornness to call it quits, even with the loss of more than one lead singer; they’ve successfully achieved a career spanning four decades.

Formed in ’74 by founding members Jean Jaques (JJ) Burnel, Jet Black and Hugh Cornwell, Dave Greenfield joined them within a year. A series of successful punk hits, then embracing a more commercial yet unique sound during the eighties, The Stranglers became a regular not only in the charts, but on the touring scene, until Hugh Cornwell split to go solo 1990. Not to be outdone, The Stranglers became one of the few bands, especially at that time, to replace their lead singer and carry on, employing Paul Roberts on vocals. Roberts left 12 years ago, but that was no stopping the boys, bringing in guitarist Baz Warne on vocals – a shared duty with JJ Burnel. Now rolling into their fifth decade – clearly nothing stops them, with Brunel nearing 60, and the incredible Jet Black, still drumming away at 73, putting many of the audience to shame.

These perennial tourers – this being The Giants Tour (in line with the new Album released 5th March) – every day in March covers pretty much any city you can name in the UK, followed by a road trip through Europe in April

It being a Saturday, support are early and we have the 10pm curfew. So first up tonight at 6.45pm is Mike Marlin, who as a young lad was inspired by the up and coming punk and British acts. By ’82 he gave up music as a career but along with the day job, at night he continued to write. It was 2011 before he released his first album ‘Nearly Man’ followed in quick succession by his new album, released in February 2012 ‘Man on the Ground.’  With full band, his songs are introspective and deep – think Lenard Cohen, certainly taking the darker side of inspiration. There’s a couple of hundred people here, and the sound is pretty terrible, he finishes his set with a spiraling melody, and polite applause from the crowd.

Next up we have The Popes, who in the nineties were known for Shane McGowan from The Pogues as their lead vocalist. After the loss of The Popes banjo god Tommy McManamon in 2006, it was time to get back together and they’re here celebrating their new album ‘Outlaw Heaven’. The line-up features Paul ‘Mad Dog’ McGuiness, Charlie Hoskins, Will Morris (Drums), Laurie Norwood (Bass) and Fiddler Ben Gummey. ‘Mad Dog': “Happy New Year – you up for it?” and we’re in for half an hour of punk meets Irish folk, upbeat, energetic and fun. Sound now much better, new track ‘Queen of Manhattan’ is a punchy song, with a plucked ditty jingle. ‘Mad Dog’ is chatty and gets the crow behind the band. ‘Don’t Let The Bastards Grind You Down’ gets the ever increasing crowd singing along, and includes a full on Irish fiddle dervish. They finishes the set off with a song for lost friends, an acknowledgement of creative and musical talent lost, “When I Die, I Will Go To Rock n Roll Heaven…”. ‘Mad Dog’ rips his shirt off, and points to the tatts on his back. Good fun, well worth seeing if you get a chance.

Then turn 8.30, and on come The Stranglers dressed, as usual, all in black, to usual impish ‘Waltzinblack’ and into first track ‘Burning Up Time.’ Warne: ” Well good evening Birmingham – how are we? We have a  new record out – I hope you know that….” so tonight’s set features a lot of their new tracks, smattered with the classics. The new stuff is indeed classic Stranglers, in their more “mellow” less punk phase. It’s good and will indeed take some listening to. The sound, thankfully, is now spot on. The venue is increasingly filling, not everyone knows it’s an early night, so there’s a few stragglers, and they are enjoying the new stuff, but it’s the older stuff that gets them going.

‘Hanging Around’ they bounce along too, ‘Golden Brown’ as always, is beautifully played, a classic in its very own special right, and still sends the hackles up n the back of your neck. Followed up by ‘ Strange Little Girl’ and their cover of ‘Walk On By.’ The first part of the set is the more melodic side of The Stranglers, they’re into the title track off the new album ‘Giants’. The cover of this album features the four band members in a line, Jet Black akin with oxygen mask, but take that as the joke it is meant to be…..

Then JJ starts off with that classic bass line and we’re into a rip-roaring edition of ‘Peaches,’ much to the crowds appreciation. Few more sings, splattered with new track, and another bass line with jangly synth, sing along everyone ‘No More Heroes, ‘ followed by ‘Relentless’ a modern classic with a mesmerising swirling melody. Next up ‘Something Better Change’ – the audience punch their fists in the air in time.

Of and on, the first encore starts of with ‘Time To Die’ and yet another classic – ‘Duchess.’ And they’re off – the crowd bay “Stranglers, Stranglers, Stranglers” and it’s not over. Back on, Warne: “Hope you’ve enjoyed your fuckin’ selves…”, an acknowledgment to the support, and we’re into ‘All The Day and All of The Night’, Warne gets the crowd chanting in the middle of the track, “Hello, look at all the bald heads!” He acknowledges sections of the audience, at the back to the right, to the left – “No booing, don’t get competitive, it’s only a game…” and back into the song. And tonight’s set is finished on ‘Tank.’ And it’s 10pm. And after rapturous applause it’s time for home.

I saw The Stranglers pretty much exactly a year ago. The set then was older stuff, a bit more punk, more aggressive – their new stuff is more mellow, like  a classic malt, still exquisite. As a band they keep it simple, as musicians, they are all individually class acts, JJ probably one of the best bass players on the touring circuit. Still  they remain uncompromising. And still they clearly love what they do. After all these years. Any new kids on the block can learn a lot from these guys, not only in staying power, but on the whole way they deliver a truly stunning musical performance. Undoubtably, they will be back next year – cos there’s simply just no stopping The Stranglers. And long may they continue.

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Setlist:

Intro – Waltzinblack

  1. Burning Up Time
  2. Sometimes
  3. Raven
  4. Lowlands
  5. Hey! It’s The Rise of the Robots
  6. Hanging Around
  7. Unbroken
  8. Time was on My Side
  9. Golden Brown
  10. Strange Little Girl
  11. Walk On By
  12. Giants
  13. Peaches
  14. Mercury Rising
  15. Lost Control
  16. Shut Up
  17. No More Heroes
  18. Relentless
  19. Something Better Change

Encore 1:

20. Time To Die

21. Duchess

Encore 2:

22. All The Day And All Of The Nigh

23. Tank

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Listening: Take your pick from way too many albums!

The Stranglers + Wilko Johnson @02 Academy, 17th March 2011

Review for Birmingham Live!

Tonight at The Academy it’s to see one of the most enduring bands – The Stranglers. Initially renowned through pub rock, then punk, then more commercial and then more rocky, The Stranglers unique style has lead to 23 UK top 40 singles and 17 UK top 40 albums. A true stubbornness to call it quits, even with the loss of more than one lead singer; they’ve successfully achieved a career spanning four decades.

Formed in ’74 by founding members Jean Jaques Burnel, Jet Black and Hugh Cornwell, Dave Greenfield joined them within a year. A series of successful punk hits, then embracing a more commercial yet unique sound during the eighties, The Stranglers became a regular not only in the charts, but on the touring scene, until Hugh Cornwell split to go solo 1990. Not to be outdone, The Stranglers became one of the few bands, especially at that time, to replace their lead singer and carry on, employing Paul Roberts on vocals. Roberts left 11 years ago, but that was no stopping the boys, bringing in guitarist Baz Warne on vocals – a shared duty with JJ Burnel. Now rolling into their fifth decade – clearly nothing stops them, with Brunel nearing 60, and the incredible Jet Black, now 72, putting many of the audience to shame, drumming his way through an hour and a half set.

Support tonight comes from another enduring singer, Wilko Johnson, creating music since ’74 initially with Dr. Feelgood and then for a period of time with Ian Dury’s band The Blockheads. Tonight he gives a half hour set, with snippets of Dr. Feelgood, slightly punk in sound – with rocking horse rhythm and blues. He gets a good response from the crowd.

Then turn 9pm, and on come The Stranglers dressed, as usual, all in black, to the cheeky impish ‘Waltzinblack’ intro. Immediately in to the politically incorrectly titled ‘I Feel Like A Wog’ the first part of the set rattles through a series of their classic tracks.

The enquiring ‘Was It You?’ and the sleazy classic ‘Peaches’ and a few words from Warne: “Believe we’re in fucking Birmingham….. Any behaviour completely excused, so get off your fuckin’ heads. Ok?” And then we’re off again into the rip-roaring ‘(Get A ) Grip (On Yourself)’.

The Stranglers audience are stubbornly loyal, just like the band. The Academy is just over half full, average age span between forties to fifties (though few punks are in the audience – clearly now grown up and responsible) and whilst chilled, are very responsive, willing to participate and respond to the band.

Couple of tracks later, and they sings along to ‘Always The Sun’ before the beautiful cords to the melting classic that is ‘Golden Brown’, still after all these years, a song that makes the hackles stand up on the back of your neck.

The set continues with slightly lesser known tracks – the crowd still engaged and up for it, some bouncing along, beer being thrown.

Warne, comfortable as band spokesman and main vocalist: “How we doing on this Saturday and ‘super moon’ ( a reference to the closest the moon has been to the earth in 18 years and the so- called pending doom this will cause). Next some for ladies. I see a few lasses and girlies but are their any ladies?” and then into ‘Two Sunspots’. Then a few more songs, including the harmonies of the rolling ‘Relentless’ from the 2006 album ‘Suit XVI’ and close of the main set to ‘Nuclear Device (Wizard Of Oz)’.

Then back on for the encore – Warne: ‘Thankyou, thank you, thank you – thank you to our support and Wilko fuckin’ Johnson. Apparently.” Then into ‘Go Buddy Go’ the crowd singing the ‘GoGoGo’ bits and getting the timing spot on for “two, three, four…”. Song two and we’re into ‘Hanging Around.”

And it’s not over yet – another encore to the thumping ‘All The Day And All Of The Night’ with Warne chatting to the audience halfway through. Then Burnel dabbling on the bass, here come the riffs and we’re into the classic ‘No More Heroes.’ To an acknowledgement that they’ll return next year – Burnel strips off his shirt and chucks it into the crowd.

The Stranglers are totally uncompromising. After all these years they have lost none of their stamina, none of their edge, none of that punk attitude, they sound great musically whether in punk vengeance or great harmonies on tracks such as  ‘Golden Brown’ and ‘Relentless’. The Stranglers are one of those bands who have been touring so long, that if you like going to gigs, you’re likely to have seen them at least once ( I think this is at least the fourth time for me.) They’re really good fun, you will bop along to some many songs you know. Full respect to them. Long may they continue. They’ll be back next year. Go and see.

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Setlist:

Intro – Waltzinblack

  1. I Feel Like A Wog
  2. Was It You?
  3. Peaches
  4. (Get A ) Grip ( On Yourself)
  5. Freedom Is Insane
  6. Always The Sun
  7. Golden Brown
  8. Nice ‘N’ Sleazy
  9. Tramp
  10. Baroque Bordello
  11. 5 Minutes
  12. Never Look Back
  13. Two Sunspots
  14. Dead Loss Angeles
  15. Threatened
  16. Something Better Change
  17. Sweden ( All Quiet On The Eastern Front)
  18. Relentless
  19. Nuclear Device (Wizard Of Aus)

Encore

20. Go Buddy Go

21. Duchess

Encore 2

22. All The Day And All Of The Night

23. No More Heroes

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Listening: Take your pick from way too many albums!